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Transforming the Gardiner Museum: A $9 Million Gift Honoring Indigenous Communities

Gardiner Museum receives $9-million gift from The Radlett Foundation in honour of the late William B.G. Humphries to fund major transformation

Explore the transformative $9 million donation from The Radlett Foundation to the Gardiner Museum and its impact on ceramics, Indigenous communities, and museum architecture.

In a monumental stride towards the future, the Gardiner Museum has received a remarkable $9 million donation from The Radlett Foundation. This extraordinary contribution, the largest individual donation in the museum’s history apart from its founders, is a tribute to the late William B.G. Humphries, the Foundation’s founder. It not only underscores Mr. Humphries’s unwavering commitment to ceramics but also signifies his profound support for Indigenous communities through the arts. This substantial gift also includes over 250 items from Mr. Humphries’s ceramics and decorative arts collection, with a particular emphasis on 18th-century English porcelain. These invaluable objects will join the 62 pieces previously donated by Mr. Humphries during his lifetime.

The Radlett Foundation’s Generosity

This section delves into the remarkable generosity of The Radlett Foundation and the significance of their donation in the context of the Gardiner Museum’s history and mission.

The Radlett Foundation’s transformative donation will serve as the catalyst for a comprehensive reimagining of the Gardiner Museum’s ground floor, spearheaded by renowned architects and designers.

A Vision for Transformation

Here, we explore the vision behind the comprehensive transformation of the Gardiner Museum’s ground floor, emphasizing principles such as connectivity, access, and Indigeneity.

A New Beginning: Maker Space and Community Engagement Center

In this section, we delve into the plans to create a fully equipped maker space and a community engagement center, shedding light on how these spaces will benefit the museum and its visitors.

Honoring Indigenous Art: The Indigenous Gallery Space

This subheading delves into the significance of the Indigenous gallery space and its role in fostering reconciliation and highlighting Indigenous contributions to ceramics.

Perspectives from the Gardiner Museum Leadership

This section features insights from Gabrielle Peacock, Executive Director & CEO of the Gardiner Museum, and Dr. Sequoia Miller, Chief Curator & Deputy Director, regarding the impact of this transformative donation.

Gabrielle Peacock: A Vision for Community Building

Explore Gabrielle Peacock’s perspective on how this donation aligns with the Gardiner Museum’s mission to build community through clay.

Dr. Sequoia Miller: Indigenous Ceramics and Reconciliation

Here, we delve into Dr. Sequoia Miller’s thoughts on the significance of the Indigenous ceramics gallery in furthering the museum’s commitment to reconciliation.

Celebrating William B.G. Humphries’s Legacy

This section highlights the legacy of William B.G. Humphries and his profound support for Indigenous communities, arts, education, and healthcare initiatives.

The Ignite the Spirit of Education Foundation

Explore how Mr. Humphries’s legacy lives on through initiatives like the Ignite the Spirit of Education Foundation, now part of The Radlett Foundation.

The Indigenous Gallery Space: A Central Focus

This subheading elaborates on the central role of the Indigenous gallery space in the museum’s ground floor redesign, emphasizing its position in showcasing Canadian and Indigenous narratives.

Curator of Indigenous Ceramics: Shaping the Narrative

Learn about the search for a Curator of Indigenous Ceramics who will lead the development and installation of the Indigenous gallery space.

Collaborative Engagement with Indigenous Partners

This section highlights the Gardiner Museum’s commitment to consultation with Indigenous partners and establishing new relationships with Indigenous cultural organizations.

Indigenous Advisory Circle: Guiding the Project

Explore the valuable guidance provided by the Indigenous Advisory Circle in shaping this transformative project.

Insights from Artist Kent Monkman

In this section, artist Kent Monkman, a member of the Gardiner Board and the Indigenous Advisory Circle, shares his perspective on the project’s significance.

Bringing Clay to Life: Architectural Design

Delve into the architectural design by Montgomery Sisam Architects and Andrew Jones Design, emphasizing the integration of clay’s warmth and tactile qualities into the visitor experience.

Accessibility and Engagement: Innovative Museum Spaces

This section explores how the project aims to provide flexible spaces for creation and interaction, as well as innovative methods for displaying objects.

Project Timeline and Community Engagement

This section outlines the estimated capital costs, construction timeline, and the Gardiner Museum’s plans for a fundraising campaign involving the broader community.

Capital Costs and Construction Timeline

Explore the financial aspects of the project, including the estimated capital costs and the anticipated commencement of construction.

Joining the Vision: Community Involvement

Learn how donors, partners, volunteers, and the community at large can play a pivotal role in realizing this transformative vision.

Explore More at Gardiner Museum

This section provides readers with information on how to learn more about the Gardiner Museum and its initiatives.

FAQs

What is the significance of the $9 million donation from The Radlett Foundation?

The donation is monumental as it serves as the catalyst for a comprehensive reimagining of the Gardiner Museum’s ground floor, emphasizing principles of connectivity, access, and Indigeneity.

How will the Indigenous gallery space contribute to the museum’s mission?

The Indigenous gallery space will showcase Indigenous ceramics, highlighting Indigenous contributions to ceramics and furthering the museum’s commitment to reconciliation.

Who is leading the development of the Indigenous gallery space?

The Gardiner Museum is currently seeking a Curator of Indigenous Ceramics to lead the development and installation of the Indigenous gallery space.

How can the community get involved in this transformative project?

The Gardiner Museum plans to launch a fundraising campaign that invites donors, partners, volunteers, and the broader community to be part of this vision and transformation.

What is the timeline for the project, and when is construction expected to begin?

Construction is anticipated to commence in the summer of 2024, with an estimated capital cost of $14 million.

How can I learn more about the Gardiner Museum and its initiatives?

For more information, visit gardinermuseum.com.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the transformative $9 million donation from The Radlett Foundation is set to reshape the Gardiner Museum, honoring Indigenous communities and ceramics while fostering a more inclusive and vibrant community hub. With a commitment to reconciliation and community engagement, this project embodies the museum’s dedication to celebrating Indigenous knowledge and creativity through its collections, exhibitions, and programming. As construction commences in 2024, the Gardiner Museum invites all to join them on this remarkable journey of transformation.

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